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that a first lady could have by being herself, by shining the light on a dark corner, by educating the public. >> next up we'll listen to president ford himself announcing the results of her surgery. >> i just returned from the hospital where i saw betty as she came from the operating room . the doctor assured me that she came through the operation all right. [applause] it's been a difficult 36 hours which our faith will sustain us and betty would expect me to be here. >> in a few weeks i will complete my chemotherapy treatments and that will be another milestone for me. since that first year i have not talked much about the difference of my experience with cancer. and t the my mast tecttoim the mastectomy and the discussion about it i was glad to see it because it prompted a large number of women to go and get checkups in their local communities. it made my recup relation easier because i knew that i was helping others. i make this progress report to help cheer up those who have just had an operation for cancer and to encourage them to keep up their good spirit. part of the battle against ca
online already. martha: disappointing news about america's education system. according to the latest survey when it comes to major subjects like math, reading and signs, u.s. teenagers fall ray behind their counter parts in asia and europe. gregg palkot is live in london to tell us more about these results. >> reporter: the international report card for schools is out. it comes from the well-regarded oedd. while we don't get an f it feels like a c. our teenagers are 20th in the world in reading skills and a as for math, 28 other countries are ahead of our teenagers. here is what they have to say about our results. >> at the end of the day quality of outcome and quality of education can never exceed the quality of instruction. >> reporter: we have had a statement from the education secretary. he calls it a picture of stagnation. while things have not gotten worse. our rankings have split because others have gotten better'. chinese cities like beijing and hong kong lead the way. in a heating unglobal economy strong numbers. martha: we are spending more money, we have more technology be
job today without some higher education, so we've helped more students go to college with grants and loans that go farther than before. we've made it more practical to repay those loans and today more students are graduating from college than ever before. we're also pursuing an aggressive strategy to promote innovation that reins in tuition cost. we have a lower cost so young people are not burdened by enormous debt when they make the right decision to get higher education. and next week, michelle and i will bring together college presidents and non-profits to lead a campaign to help more low-income students attend and succeed in college. but -- [ applause ] while higher education may be the surest path to the middle class, it's not the only one. so we should offer our people the best technical education in the world. that's why we've worked to connect local businesses with community colleges so workers, young and old, can earn the new skills that earn them more money. and i've also embraced an idea that i know all of you at the center for american progress have championed. and b
. the education system is riddled with problems. and you also see that there is an increasing public corruption. so the current president has been involved in a huge scandal involving his private home. so people look to nelson mandela and think theres with a leader. there was someone with real integrity. so i think that this is a moment for people to look back and reflect on where they've come from and how to get back on the right path. >> woodruff: and also by definition losing what i think you call the moral center for the country. >> well, i think for many people nelson pan della does represent a kind of moral center. and a choice to turn away from violence, to turn away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. and instead of standing in judgement of one another, to reconcile and to admit that we did terrible things to each other. but now we're ready to move on. and i think that was the great gift of nelson mandela. that he was able to bring people together in a way that made them feel that they could forgive and made them move on. >> woodruff: lydia, one other thing. you wrote t
in the workshop and educators can get lesson plans to use in the classroom. >> you don't use sugar for any of these things, right? sugar has seen a big decrease in the last five weeks. sugar prices have dropped pretty steadily in the last five weeks. there's nothing surprisingly in the 12 days that uses sugar, right? >> if you remember last year, becky, we had the drought in the summertime which drove up food prices and grain prices. >> right. right. >> which caused the bird costs to go up. this year both energy and food prices are down. >> we were going to play a little music or something so the total price is, did you tell us that already, $27,993.17. up 7.7% this year, joe. >> 7.7. inflation. all right, jim. thank you. >> good to see you. happy holidays. >>> folks, it is cyber monday. that's when people return to work and do some shopping online. we're going to talk about ecommerce prospects when "squawk box" comes right back ♪ ♪ the most wonderful time of the year ♪ capital to make it happen? without the thinking that makes it real? what's a vision without the expertise to execut
of the countries committment to education. switzerland is followed by singapore, denmark, sweden and luxemborg. the us.-- placed 9th younger generations are thinking ahead when it comes to retirement. a study finds 59 percent of gen x workers contribute to 401(k) plans.that's followed by gen y at 56 boomers - faced with their own set of retirement challenges - save with 401-k's at a rate of 46 percent. the online user-review business is a multi-million dollar industry and with that comes the need to be protected from vicious online attacks. ky sisson tells us about the business of protecting one's corporate reputation on the internet. with over 117 million monthly visitors, yelp's massive directory of ratings and reviews for the best places to go is loved by millions of consumers, but is often frustrating to business owners. i think it tends to spread a fair amount of misinformation. i think the majority of our guests and the majority of the public is somewhat skeptical of yelp. dave donaldson is the director of operations at stillwater spirits and sounds in dana pointe california
journalism, period. >> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >> and welcome back. tonight we're looking in depth at health care in privately run prisons in america and in the second part of his investigation, america tonight's adam may, said that in an effort to save money, privatized care has sentenced some prisoners to death. >> it's a growing trend, states looking to trim budgets. to date, at least 28 states have privatized prison care. american friend services, in arizona, since the time the state privatized the prison health care , cost d
the real problem here is public education, if you have never had health insurance before, you don't know how it works and you've never applied for it and never done anything, you need to be educated and there's a whole lot of people out there who have not had health insurance before or how to use it. >> there are a lot of people who don't have computers and a lot of people are watching television about this sort of thing, so you have a real public education problem that goes with any major social change like this. it was no different for social security or for medicare or for the drug benefit under medicare. there's always a lot of education that has to be done. >> we know that there's a renewed sense of confidence certainly coming from the white house and certainly coming from democrats who have been anxious about this, and i know that as of tuesday in your state more than 175,000 residents have enrolled in health care coverage since october 1st and we know since november 14th, enrollments have increased by 55%. in your opening remarks from yesterday's committee hearing from the aca imp
a wage when they're trying to earn a living. as we have more older and highly educated people in that sector. >> if you had a perfect system in a test tube, though, and it's not that way, it just seems to me, if you can find someone not working that is willing to work at whatever the market price is, you can fill enough jobs that you want, it seems like, you know, if you're true to economics, it seems like you would never set anything. you'd want the market. >> this is an idea that says -- >> and the other thing, jared, is it not this simple? a company can either have 100 people at $8 an hour or 80 people at $10 an hour. >> it's definitely not that simple. let me respond to both of those. i thought it was gary who gave a good list of the way that minimum wages -- the increases tend to get absorbed. and that's why, joe, your second point i think is wrong. he talked about profits, he talked about prices. there's also efficiency gains. clearly, the absorption mechanism isn't just on the employment margin. that's why we get those results i've been describing through our discussion
mandela and it will be tomorrow at f and b stadium in johannesburg and a belief that education was the only way for people to raise up from poverty and where that legacy stands today. and revolutionary cancer treatment and using one deadly disease to battle another. >> i'm mark and coming up, the afc race is heating up as manning is a leg up on the competition, that is ahead in sports. >>> wintry conditions will improve today but i'm tracking another round of snow for the northeast, i'll have details coming up. >>> al jazeera america continues and thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. ♪ straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be a
talks about education in the u.s.. >> being lady like does not require silence. why should my husband's job or yours prevent us from being ourselves? i do not believe that being first lady should prevent me from expressing my ideas. [applause] >> betty ford spoke her mind, pro choice and a supporter of the equal rights amendment. she and gerald ford openly discussed her experience with breast cancer. for much of her family's public life she struggled with alcohol and drug dependency and confronting it defined her post white house years. >> welcome to first ladies influence and image. tonight we'll tell you the story of elizabeth ford, the wife of president gerald ford. here to tell her story is richard norton smith. you know him, he's one of our academic advisors for the whole project. he's helped launch a number of presidential libraries among them the gerald r. ford library in michigan. you developed a relationship with the fords so you bring that to the table. >> sure. i try to be as objective as possible. but i was very fortunate to become a good friends of both of the fords. >> w
much. the education secretary tony called it the picture of stagnation. >> there is a lot of work that needs to be done. >> but to make you feel better these tests aren't that criminal, but the bigger thing to learn is critical thinking. >> higher order thinking. we were just talking about it. >> we were just talking about it. >> it links to reading, comprehension, and hang on to the music, and it links to matthew. >> that's why some advocates say don't freak out about these kinds of tests and comparison because a lot of it based on memorization and the most important is critical thinking. >> thank you. now. >> you've been hearing that detroit has become the largest municipality to file bankruptcy. david, remember us again, how serious are detroit's financial problems? >> it's very serious. it's serious to the point of all the money that the city of detroit takes in to their tax receipts and revenue, $0.40 on the dollar has to go as far as dealing with the debt that detroit has accumulated. if they did nothing that proportion would go up to $0.65 on the dollar. that is money that
some of the people behind this education revolution. >>> and taking a live look outside at 8:37. we have live sky 7 hd looking out over mt.dy on diabldiablo. there's snow on some mountain tops this morning in the bay area. snow in the last couple of hours. hours. lisa argen will fill y to those who've been denied equal access to health care... welcome to covered california. now, you can no longer be denied coverage because of a pre-existing condition. enroll today at can impart one lesson to a new business owner, it would be one thing i've learned is my philosophy is real simple american express open forum is an on-line community, that helps our members connect and share ideas to make smart business decisions. if you mess up, fess up. be your partners best partner. we built it for our members, but it's open for everyone. there's not one way to do something. no details too small. american express open forum. this is what membership is. this is what membership does. >>> welcome back, everyone. it is 8:40 on saturday morning. you are looking live at boulder creek in san
. >> the director of the sixth sense, says there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> while you were asleep, news was happening. >> here are the stories we're following. >> find out what happen
. >> ...thought provoking >> get your damn education. >> ...surprising >> oh, absolutely! >> ...exclusive one-on-one interviews with the most interesting people of our time. >> you're listening because you want to see what's going to happen. >> i want to know what works what do you know works? >> conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> talk to al jazeera. >> only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >> after a relaunch following a botched roll out, the white house is aggressively reselling the affordable healthcare again. he aimed at explaining why the affordable care act was enacted and why people should be encouraged to sign up. >> right now what that law is doing, yes, you agree with me. right now what this law is doing is helping folks, and we're just getting started with the exchanges. just getting started with the marketplaces. we're not going to walk away from them. if i got to fight another three years to make sure this law works, then that's what i do. >> the website is still the visible part of obamacare. while it seems to be working better that's only part of the battle. to make
personal adversity and committed to philanthropy and higher education. you know who else got one this year? class of 2014, coty at honey well and jerry jones, owner of the cowboys. they're in great company with you. congratulations. that's a real honor. it's a big deal for the class of 2014. >> well, thank you for saying that joe. it is an honor. i admire the ratio society greatly. they take individuals andle challenge circumstances and give them an opportunity through scholarships to change their life through education. and to join companies not only those you mentioned but most importantly our previous winner our founder. i never thought it would happen in my lifetime. >> you didn't get it yet, did you? when do they do it? >> no. the event is in april in washington d.c. >> it's a big deal. >> it's quite something. i look forward to hit. >> can congratulations. we'll check back with you on. that think about it if you see the tape. i look good in that suit. >> actually joe, when i see the ron burgundy commercial, i do think of you. i don't know why. >> i think that's a compliment? thanks m
that poverty because she lacks a dicent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, that should affect all of us. >> it should compel us to action. we are a better country. let me repeat. the combined trends of inceffed inequality pose a fundamental effect. >> republicans were quick to cit size of president's remarks. the income gap is caused by policies claiming that the affordable care act and tougher business regulations encourage company depends on the government. the statistics are telling. from 2009 to 2012 the average engine from the top 1% of earners increased 31%. incomes for the rest of the nation's workers rose by one half of one%. >> thousands of fast-food workers scheduled to last their ship are striking. in 100 cities they are striking, demanding pay. today's strikes are the latest move in a campaign that started last summer. the medium wage is slightly more than $900. >> the workers live in poverty, working in conditions. >> more than two and a quarter americans have non-management jobs with the top 10 fast food chains. anti-government fo
. it kicks off computer science education week. org.s sponsored by code. here is president obama. notearning these skills are important for your future but for our country's are. if you want america to stem the cutting edge tom a we need young americans to master the tools and technology that will change how you do just about everything. >> they are giving coding tips from entrepreneurs included this guy, mark zuckerberg. >> if i wanted to wish everybody on facebook and happy birthday by sending an e-mail, it might take more than a century to write out all the e-mails. with a few lines of code, i can have a system to send an e-mail to everybody on facebook. that is why they are valuable. francisco us from san is the cofounder of whether that mark zuckerberg, what is the point of this? >> it is great to be here. that weioned earlier are lagging in math and science. at least every school in america does teach math and teach science. only one in 10 schools teach computer science. yourself, if the point of education is to prepare kids for afe and the 21st century tom shouldn't we teach
at the numbers, it's startling. we spend $15,000 per every student in this country on education and that's more than every single country in the developed world and japan beat us in the international ranking that you mentioned and we're throwing money at the problem. it's not the lack of spending, it's the character of the spending. it's not trickling down to the classroom, it's federal government regulation and it should be a state-run education should belong to the state and no child left behind. it usurps a lot of power from the states and that to me that's the problem not relegating to the states. stuart: you'd get rid of it-- not all of it, but some of the bureaucracy because that's where the money is flowing, the administrators of the schools and all kind of people backing them up, the bureaucracy. you'd get rid of that. >> yes. stuart: but can you? kayleigh, you can't, you can't do that. i mean, the unions are so firmly entrenched and there's a big vote in favor of those unions. in favor of teachers, and i don't know if you can get around that? >> yeah, and i think you hit the nail on th
despite calls for government spending on education and unemployment benefits. cheryl: minimum wage watch out for new york and chicago and the joy. fast-food companies demanding $15 an hour.ill hear from them p next. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7. i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel tt in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to save. ally bank. your money needs an ally. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. she loves a lot ofas it's what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that cou be a q
discusses education legislation passed this his state concerning teacher accountability, charter schools and changes to underperforming k-12 schools. governor malloy has called education the civil rights issue of our time, and he'll talk about his agenda at a forum of the american enterprise institute beginning at 1:30 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies this 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: and best selling author tom standage has a new book out, and it's called "writing on the wall." tom standage, what do cicero and twitter have in common? >> guest: well, the idea of the book is that social media is a very old idea. we think that it's recent and only people alive today have ever done it. but really what i'm arguing is there's a very long and rich tradition of social media that goes back to the era of cicero, so that's the first century b.c., and the point is that you don't need a digital network to do social media. if you have one, it goes faster, but you could actually do it in the old days. cicero
you the poster child for south africa's education. the mandela family was quoted describing you as the face of the new south africa. what is the face of the young generation of post-apartheid south africa. >> i think the young face of this new south africa is a dynamic face. we don't - our revolution will not be a political one. our revolution will be a revolution driven by innovation and prosperity across all income levels in south africa. we are very dynamic generation. my story is like that of millions of south africans. >> you describe this challenge rising to the challenge of innovation. what about domestically are there changes to that that young people face in south africa as they try to meet a global threshold to be competitive. >> certainly, which is why i believe my story resonates. a challenge is education. more south africans, world class education. the commitment to education, not just education, but achieving excellence. it's a challenge that i am sure my peers will adopt in the next couple of years. >> speaking of achieving educational excellence. is it true that
was in some ways accidentally privileged by being able to get a missionary education, and he started out life essentially with a tremendous sense of self-confidence inspired by his local community. and to take him from that position which makes him an aspiring lawyer, by his early 30s he's already rising the ranks of the anc only marks the ways in which he evolved as an individual. and i think we have to hold that in place because he lived so long that he was able to draw on so many strains of thought. so, yes, he went through a period where he embraced africanism or black nationalism to a point where the notion of race first many the tradition of a marcus garvey in the united states, for example, this notion that black people have to solidify. and yes, the anc, there was tension there. >> such a great point, he lives to be nearly 100 years old. his trajectory for change is very different from that of a king who was assassinated while still a young man. one quick question then more after the break. not only do we misremember mandela, we misremember ourselves in relationship to mandela. we now
cahealth care a education, we're still in it but it's just changed phases. >> one of the things that has to change, and one of the things professor ogletree said about him being a patriot, it is a much different world then than it is now. the great cold war was on at that time and the south african government was aligned with the united states. and people who were seeing that struggle were seeing the south african government as an ally of the united states and not paying enough attention to the big human rights issues. but the big issue going forward now is president zuma in south africa now and does he get the lessons from the life and leadership of president mandela and other leaders in africa, and not just continent but around the world that they can take something away from that. there are not going to be a lot of people dancing in the streets because they're mourning the loss of mugabwe, for example, next door, but i hope the lesson this week and the days to come, that people will see the real value of the kind of leadership that was not self-centered and it was not based on divisio
their research, when they call us, we can put a good educated--get them in the right vehicle at the right price that fits their need. >> for the commuter, what is the most important thing they should do when they're doing their research on line, they reach out to somebody, contact by your distributorship, look, i understand you're interested in a gmc truck. what information do they need right there, or what are questions that they should ask to be sure they're headed towards a great deal. >> what is a great deal? every manufacturer, everybody has a great deal from $99 a month to zero percent. but customers doing research on the car, they're looking to spend quite a bit of money, especially in the buick, gmc line. they're looking at their options and what will be comfortable for themselves. when they're researching for the car they're looking to talk to somebody who can guide them in the right direction. mostly 88% of people who are out there, they're doing research, and they're trying to fit their needs so when they come in the show room maybe that time is minimized. >> finally-- >> the deal wa
with me at this time fond memories of systematic education, patient, calculated, measured, to ensure that we begin to appreciate that struggle is not just about emotional drive, but that we need it to learn the tactics that would make us [ inaudible ] to fight us, and enable us to survive through thick and thin. >> reporter: on the streets where he lived during apartheid people gathered too. this was a hot bed of -- [ technical difficulties ] >> he is a hero to all around the world. everyone is very sad right now because he is gone. >> reporter: many people here say they will celebrate his life. millions of south africans won't be able to attend the state funeral, but they plan to say farewell in their own way. they say they are going to line the streets all across south africa and say farewell to the father of the nation and thank you for making south africa what it is today. nelson mandela inspired millions of people to reconcile and forgive. they begin to prepare to say good-bye. >>> the death of nelson mandela is also hitting home. communities across the u.s. are paying tribute
world aids day and one man says the traditional forms of educating people about the virus, they aren't effective. this is how he plans to make a world of difference in providing knowledge for youth. >> reporter: tom hays never thought he would be the face of a national campaign for world aids day. like so many other young people he says he didn't know much about the disease. that is until it was too late. two years agos hays found out he was hiv positive. >> i felt i'd been let down by my school system and other places i expect to get special health information from. i was a 25-year-old gay man living in london. i knew something about sexual health so i set out to create something that was approachable, yet educational for younger people. >> and so he started beyond positive, an online magazine geared toward helping young people understand the disease. >> we get near a hundred e- mails a day and most of them are people in their teens asking very very basic questions about safer sex, hiv, and std's, stuff you hope anybody would know. >> world health organization says young people woul
do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> and welcome back. tonight we're looking in depth at health care in privately run prisons in america and in the second part of his investigation, america tonight's adam may, said that in an effort to save money, privatized care has sentenced some prisoners to death. >> it's a growing trend, states looking to trim budgets. to date, at least 28 states have privatized prison care. american friend services, in arizona, since the time the state privatized the prison health care, cost dropped $30 million. 50 people died in arizona department of corrections custody in just the first eight months of this year. compare this to 37 deaths in the previous two years combined. >> some people just believe the government is the only one to care for this people. >> state attorney general john cavanaugh, we asked him whether he thought it put inmates in danger. >> people die in prisons. i receive a lot of hand
to be a teacher? >> it's an awesome feeling to have brought up children in the multi-racial education society and they have proved that they can make it out there? >> did you have that opportunity? >> no. >> the family is raising a black child and their community, while not fully integrated is more diverse. >> it's not only blacks, only whites. eyes are open. >> today was a national day of prayer and reconciliation anna katrada new man dela for years, including two decades in prison. >> with freedom comes responsibility. freedom did not fall from heaven. >> today, they did say good buy and thanked the man who gave their children the diverse future they never had. >> as perussia put it to me today she was thanking mandel a for creating a special currents tree for her children do -- country for her children to grow up in. >> new mexico new mexico visited l.a. in 1990 after his release from prison. it's a visit that still r resonates with many today. brian rooney has more >> reporter: they remembered new mexico new mexico all day here at the first ame church in los angeles. they say they have f
: the education system, the job system is not treating all americans equally. you see that in the minority numbers. some of the callers have talked about this. anyou're going into environment where you are the orst person of this race gender in that role, how much more difficult is it for you to break in as opposed to a workforce that is more diverse? host: you look at the overall but the number%, approaches numeral seven percent because of the increase in african-american unemployed and teenagers. correct? guest: that is part of the factors. you have much higher unemployment among minorities and younger people. you also look at it based on educational breakdowns. the unemployment rate is considerably higher among those who have not completed high school compared to those who have completed college. work isic morath's available online. thank you for being with us. coming up next, the vice president is back in the u.s. following a weeklong trip that included stops in china, south korea, and japan. we will have david lampton joining us from johns hopkins to discuss the state of relations between the
the questions. sallie mae also is the biggest u.s. student lender. loans to student of on education from the 2012 program for international student assessment, an exam given to 15-year-old worldwide shows the 90 students lagging in math and just average in reading. american students fail to place in the top 20 in any category. education secretary arne duncan calls the result "picture of educational stagnation coastal but added we must invest in early education, raise academic standards, and do more to notchit and obtain top- educators. top scoring teams are in singapore, south korea, japan, and hong kong. an update on the new york city ormuter train derailment reporting investigators believe the operator of the train involved in the jarrell meant on sunday fell asleep prior to the incident. william rockefeller all but admitted he dozed off. sources say he was, in their words, jolted from a sleep and hit the break. but he did not have enough time to stop the train as they headed into a curve rated for only 30 miles an hour at a speed of greater than 82 miles per hour. four people were kil
to educate your thumb, you transfer the money from your face to your friends face and to drop money on their face. [laughter] it is like just the most fun you'll ever have paying someone back. so that's really what i wanted to share with you today about simple. i would just say if you looking at an industry that is really, really collocated, that is where the opportunity lies. health care, finance, banking, i mean, these are really complex industries and they are just screaming out for help. if i could leave you with one thing is, seek out the complexity and simple quiet. thank you. [applause] >> i'm actually not very good at listening to other people. i'm used to talking so this is kind of weird. next up is alex mittal. no, alex. let's go. this will be fun. from the founders club. how are you? >> i want to hear more plain stories. >> we met this morning for the first time and again on her show. we had a little chat. it was good and tell everybody, what do you do? >> i worked with the founders club. we are the first online venture capital firm, and i saw some common themes with the
. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these educated people on the set what is he trying to say. >> i went to alabama so i can probably explain it better than anybody else. boy that cuts like a knife. >> tell me, what is the concept. >> we don't know how to kick a field goal when we're at the 15 yard line. >> great game. >> is anyone here? >> kicked the ball -- 59 yard kick but we don't kick a 15 yard field goal. anyway, so let me just say there were a lot of people -- i'm going to say two things so you can't jump on me after i say the first thing. okay. >> okay. >> number one i hate to be harold ford everybody told us back in 1996 when we tried to pass welfare reform and limit the number of weeks, months, years people could be on welfare that we were the most cold hearted hateful people of all time and young children would starve and grand mothers would be thrown out in the snow. we were. we were called the most heartless people of all time. we passed it over two bill clinton wes to. he signed at any time third time. most everybody said that it was a great s
. >> the education of this president is a subtracting and moving process as it was this week as he continues with the scent of profound government. bill: brit hume is our political analyst. >> i got a chuckle out of that. bill: what did you think of that observation? >> the president said something about people blowing their money in las vegas, and then somewhat later he said it again in las vegas is hurting and need the business. and this is why you don't have to be a governor to know and understand and it operates slowly behind this technologically and otherwise. and no executive experience. so we have gotten to travel within this along the learning curve. bill: there are these agencies that are outdated with the structure of a lot of these agencies, reform is hard to do and a lot of these programs and activities have constituencies and so on and it's hard to change it. and i think most people intuitively understand that in this is the health and human services program that basically kind of left it alone and didn't put this in overall charge of a for at that time. bill: the hhs or irs, al
was familiar with howard and the extent to which howard had anticipated in african education the same as the university of ft. hayre has participated in african education in east and central africa. that was a very smooth relationship for the two universities and i went there as a result set up an office, howard university, to help put in place collaboration between our university and university at howard. the bottom line of that was that we at howard established what we call the south african research and archive al project to study the anti-apartheid movement in the united states. >> dr. harris, what would you say is the legacy, the dual legacy, of nelson mandela both in south africa and in this country? and i guess i'm asking that specificically because you sort of had a bird's eye view of what he was able to do in the country and what he was able to create by extension, by reaching out to howard university to say we want there to be some role here in what happens with south africa going forward. >> well, we were very excited when he came because everyone knew about him. in respons
children are learning in school. you will meet some of the people behind the education revolution. and at 5:38, this is a beautiful view from our exploratorium cam. you see the skyline there, the transamerica pyramid kind of sort of. cold out there, 44 crease, but wa [ ding ] cheese plate? cheese plate. no, i made something better. you used the oven? boom. [ male announcer ] pillsbury crescents. make the holidays pop. ♪ make t♪ holidays pop. hey, that's the last crescent! oh, did you want it? yeah. we'll split it. [ female announcer ] made fresh, so light, buttery and flakey. that's half. that's not half! guys, i have more. thanks, mom. [ female announcer ] do you have enough pillsbury crescents? to thsuffered in silence... hoped... and lived in a state of fear... welcome to a new state... of health. welcome to covered california. the place to find quality, affordable coverage. financial help for those in need. and nobody can be denied because of a pre-existing condition. enroll now at >> the holidays have arrived in washington, d.c. >> three, two, one! whew! >> yesterda
the education revolution. and coming up at 6:37 this morning, the live view from our mt. tam cam. you see the camera shaking a little bit there. it's windy. it's winter. temperatures in the low 30s to don't worry, santa will find us. ♪ [ female announcer ] this christmas, light santa's way with the hallmark santa signal ornament. and why can you move the tv out here? the wireless receiver. i got that when i switched to u-verse. but why? because it's so much better than cable. it's got more hd channels, more dvr space. yeah, but i mean, how did you know? i researched. no, i-i told you. no. yeah! no. the importan and i got you this visor. you made a visor! yes! that i'll never wear. ohh. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv for just $19 a month for two years with qualifying bundles. rethink possible. with qualifying bundles. to those who've encountered welcome to covered california. new, affordable health plans so you can be ready for whatever comes your way. enroll today at >> welcome back. >> the holidays have arrived in washington, d.c. >> three, two, one! whew! >> yesterda
. a fascinating character. to many jews, highly educated, and using. from newport rhode island, and fantastic american was from a very good ones family who went to yale, ph.d. at harvard. the aged 27 he was given charge of the survey of all the lands between sacramento and the west of cheyenne. a hundred miles to the north and south, the 40th parallel survey. to consider years. the books and maps. could cost hundreds of thousand dollars. beautifully, beautifully accomplished. and he had all sorts of amazing adventures while doing the survey, but as a reward for doing so well he was appointed to be the first-ever director of the newly established body count the united states geological survey which, of course, today the country in its entirety. the move to new york, the headquarters of the usgs and he was the first director. the second was john wesley powell. his personal life is what i want to mention briefly. i was astonished when i stumbled across it. help no one will hold this against and, but he was a sexually energetic in man, but he did not like white women. he loved native american wom
education programs. will the tax catch on? steve forbes, "forbes" editor in chief lives in new jersey. >> i saw 60 years ago this was coming along. david: wealth tax, it is small increment increase. i think city tax would go 3.9 to 4.3, 4.4. it is small but all of these wealth taxes always start out small. i think of the amt, alternative minimum tax, originally designed for a couple dozen people. now it affects millions. >> that's right. it also sends a signal out that new york city takes prosperity such as it is for granted. new york does have unique advantages. it won't kill the city but sends a message out, we're not interested in entrepreneurs. more importantly we don't understand real wealth creation. if anything you should be doing the opposite. in terms of what he wants to finance, in terms of education, if he is really a believer in hecation why does he have the hostility to charter schools which demonstrated to help people who need help the most? david: specifically on the tax issue is there any evidence that people do vote with their feet when people raise, when people come up wit
-house education collegettee examines affordability and appel grant program. you can see it live at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span three. colombian president one man well santos speaks at the national press club about the economic and political situation in colombia. that is live also on c-span3. >> as you walk in, there tables out front with pamphlets, prior to entering the gun show. howpamphlets are all about the government is trying to take away your guns. those were the guys i wanted to talk to. they were the guys with the leaflets. i said to them. is this yourself? and they said yeah, who are you. i said i am an academic, a researcher and i'm doing research on these organizations and these ideas and trying to understand them. a bunch of them looked at me suspiciously and said -- and asked me questions. i said look, here's what i am. i don't get it. here's my job. i want to understand how you see the world. i want to understand your worldview. look, you will not convince me, and i will not convince you. that is off the table. what is on the table is at one to understand why you think the way you do
, correct? >> i work with the best hackers and crypto experts in the world and lucky enough to be educated by them to understand what really happens on internet and kind of information is available to bad guys and good guys making money. all of that was really, that education is what really brought me to build wicker. it's a way for my friends and family to communicate and not have to worry about someone else watching them. lori: so what can you tell me about the technology? essentially data disappears after six days. you can program the time period if you want? >> exactly. in order for a message to truly self-destruction, 2 has to be anonymous, private and secure. we also, forensically wipe everything on the device after it is gone. we delete the metadata and bind the messages to the device. on top of using top secret encryption. lori: could you take a screen grab though. >> that is a really good question. in the version 2.0% releasing this coming week we actually took out the anti-tam perking, anti-screen tab technology because we wanted to prove a point that we always say this is, this
that can have the education and provide the lifestyle that they need to have. but he chose, god chose him to go to that country. to do something. from the comments that we received from the children, and the students and the people that knew him, his goal was accomplished. did he touch people's lives. he did make life different for all the people that he touched. not only here in america but also in libya. >> his family was already back in the u.s. when this happened. do you know how they're doing? >> i'm sure they're shocked and disbelief. i believe the church will have a special service on sunday where his wife and his son will be present there at the church. it will be very touching. because we loved him. and he had the greatest hug, the biggest smile ever. and his life was like he played tennis. no matter he was 6-0, he would run people that played him against him. he was challenged and always come up the best that he could on the tennis court and off the tennis court. i think that's the life he led and the life he wanted to continue living. even in a dangerous situation. >> we feel s
for the 2010 winter olympics. you really need to educate yourself about brain injuries and how dangerous they can be. after my injury the doctors were saying that the helmet saved my life. wearing a helmet to prevent severe traumatic brain injury is a must... and so is learning what you can do to prevent concussion. ♪ it's not about the money, money, money ♪ >>> beautiful kate middleton, always looks like a million bucks everywhere she goes. so, what if we told you that the glamorous necklace she's wearing right there in that photo, is amazingly affordable. in fact, you could go out and buy the exact same one for yourself today without breaking the bank. and what i love about her style, aside from just being beautiful, she mixes and matches designer duds with affordable things. >> that's a look i try to rock, as well. and sara haines will be modeling that necklace, coming up in "pop news." >>> this is saturday, december 7th. also coming up this half hour, high schools across the country, love to put on the show, "grease." but there's one production that's getting extra attention beca
of what you do? savings and investments, isn't it? >> education is a major factor, whether you have good health insurance, able to control your own destiny. education is one of the biggest factors and we can't emphasize that in most. we focus on what you can do. individuals have a tremendous amount of power and determining their individual destinies and they are very practical, living within your means. dennis: let me point out a lot of emphasis lamenting the gap, nobody talking about don't get as many tattoos, don't buy as much gold jewelry. how about cutting back and saving. >> exactly, don't over leverage yourself. dennis: thank you. from bank cheryl: lets go to the floor of the new york stock exchange. senior vice president. just speaking within the last 20 minutes, anything you have heard from them that changes your opinion about the timing of the taper? >> no, it doesn't. he had to think mindset with them. more of a centrist. they are the three biggest hawks that fit inside the federal reserve system. unfortunately the matter what they say when it is working anymore or no
year. 20 young children and six educators were murdered that day on december 14th, 2012. this saturday, marks a year since that horrific event. as you can see the news conference is beginning. we'll monitor what the officials have to say and bring you any headlines moments from now. today's top headlines and brand new stories you will sear here first. jon: the obamacare website gets a makeover. new options are able if you're shopping. with deadline looming do the updates matter? >>> wild weekend weather across the u.s. and more is on the way. meteorologist maria molina on where people should be preparing now. >>> silicon valley versus washington. the nation's top tech companies teaming up to send a message to uncle sam. ease up on all snooping. it is all "happening now." jon: well the obamacare website getting a face-lift but ongoing problems with the federal exchange may be more than skin deep. i hope you had a good weekend. good morning to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: does obamacare cover facelifts? is that a question we're leading with today. jon: let's hope not. >> hi, everybody. i'm
out of this government. there is not enough education for them and the jobs aren't plentiful enough, the pay is not plentiful, the housing is substandard. they feel they have not made any progress and in many cases they have stopped hoping for it. they said we need another government. there is a lot of pride in nelson mandela but there remains mostly because of economics a lot of advertis dissatisfaction. in his time or in his memory he hasn't been able to bridge the economic gap. tony. >> ali velshi. thank you. jonathan betz is here. jonathan. >> it is going to be a who's who of royals, celebrities, a leader of every major country will be in south africa, 100 have rscped so far. the queen of gland can't make it but david cameron can. mandela also close with cuba so its president, rool castro, -- raul castro will be there. hassan rouhani is coming. put not israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. he is concerned about the high security cost. >>> the dalai lama will be there. ful of johannesburg wip be shut down. an entire airport will be set aside for just the vips. security will
. >> democrats have been hoping to restore funding for medical research and education. the pressure is on patty murray and republican congressman paul ryan to finalize a deal to fund the government beyond january 15th. a new push from democrats in recent days has been a $25 billion unemployment extension which is due to run sought december 28th. >> right now more than 1 million of americans are poses to lose a vital lifeline, a few days after christmas, if congress doesn't do something about it. >> unemployment benefits have been extended five times at a price tag of $226 billion and some conservatives argue more extensions are not acceptable. >> they are causing them to become a perpetual part of the unemployed in our economy and while it seems good, it does a disservice to those who need a help. >> and they said it wasn't part of the necessity of a budget agreement. >> negotiations are moving in the right direction. they haven't closed the deal. but i hope as part of it, the negotiators will take to heart what the president had to say. >> the budget conferree was optimistic. >> the key is not
or the department of education. and as we reported in 2009, most of those bills were paid for by the government with few or no questions asked and with an estimated 30% of the treatments having no meaningful impact. >> ms. klish, it's dr. byock. >> marcia klish is either being saved by medical technology or being prevented from dying a natural death. >> we're just here checking on you. >> she's been unconscious in the intensive care unit at dartmouth hitchcock medical center in lebanon, new hampshire, for the better part of a week. one of her doctors, ira byock, told us it costs up to $10,000 a day to maintain someone in the icu. >> this is the way so many americans die. something like 18% to 20% of americans spend their last days in an icu. and, you know, it's extremely expensive. it's uncomfortable. many times they have to be sedated so that they don't reflexively pull out a tube, or sometimes their hands are restrained. this is not the way most people would want to spend their last days of life. and yet this has become almost the medical last rites for, you know, people as they die. okay, le
college classrooms and secondary education will sanitize a little bit of nelson mandela's story, not tell the full picture. >> i hope not. i hope the college professors and administrators will insist we tell the whole story. we don't have to idolize nelson mandela. we can present him as the ful - fully-fleshed human being with all his noble qualities and his flaws. i think the interesting thing that he illustrates is moral leaders often go to places that are unlikely, and unexpected. they develop relationships. they initiate conversations. that upset the equilibrium in order to produce justice, in order to catalyze change. i think that's what today's millennials can college students around the country are interested in. authentic leaders who keep it real. >> talk about upsetting people. julian, back to you, talking about during the bush administration in 2003 when nelson mandela made the statement in regard to the iraq war. as he said, president bush has romanticized justifications as far as why the u.s. was involved. he said, all he, being president bush, all he wants is iraq oil. so ho
are the jobs? >> unemployment for college-educated workers is below 4%. so when you look at that 7% number, it represents a lot of people who have not gotten their high school education or maybe just have a high school education. if you have a college degree, we're seeing job growth in professional and business services, certainly in engineering which continues to be kind of a real driver of jobs, health care is net hire job creator over the last several years and hires nurses and other technicians. there are good jobs being created. when you look at this total number, say, 200,000-plus this month, certainly a good percentage of them were in the lower wage category. but then we want -- those people who are out of work having the hardest time, need those jobs, too. >> we saw the fight over raising the minimum wage heat up this week. you wrote an interesting piece about the rise of income inequality. what would raising the minimum wage do in this country to close the income gap? do we even know? >> first of all, i'm all in favor of having this discussion about wages and equality. the minimum
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